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8 posts tagged architecture

New York Assessment and Public Transits

New York Time Square

New Yorkers don’t ride the subway because they’re more enlightened or more environmentally aware than other Americans; New Yorkers ride the subway because owning and driving a car in the city is almost ridiculously disagreeable.

Curbside parking is scarce, and parking lots are shockingly expensive and often inconveniently situated or hard to find. Most important of all, the average speed of crosstown traffic in Manhattan is little more than that of a brisk walker. At certain times of the day, in fact, the cars on the side streets in midtown more so slowly that they appear almost to be parked. Most people, including most New Yorkers, view such clogged streets as an urgent environmental problem, since the cars seem to just sit there, spewing exhaust. But traffic jams like those actually generate environmental benefits, because they urge drivers (and cab riders) either into the subways or onto the sidewalks.

New York is surely the only city in America where you are likely to hear someone say, “We’d better take the subway—we don’t have time for a cab.” Making that cab ride more attractive than the subway, by reducing the congestion on the streets, would be a loss for the environment, not a gain. 

Proponents of new or expanded transit systems often act as though the only significant keys to their success were infrastructure and determination—that if cities would build decent transit systems and residents would make a commitment to use them everything would be fine. But this has been proven, repeatedly, not to be true. A city can build the more attractive light-rail line ever conceived, and then spend millions urging residents to use it, but if the local population is too spread out to be served efficiently and cost-effectively by transit, and if driving remains a plausible alternative, then transit never achieves the ridership levels that were predicted for it—and no amount of browbeating, public-service advertising, or federal spending can change that. 

You can’t reduce the automobile use by a meaningful amount simply by lecturing people that riding the bus is better for the earth, or better for their soul. And that’s true anywhere. As committed as New Yorkers appear to be to walking and riding the subway, it wouldn’t take much to turn them into car owners. If every Manhattan apartment came with a free garage parking space, Manhattanites would have cars, too.

9 August 2011           Reblog    
 
Integrating Nature into the Concrete Jungle – Vegitecture 
What is Vegitecture?
 
Simply put: A unique form of architecture that seamlessly integrates plants into a building’s frame work. Vegitecture’s environmental impact is as noticeable as its plants too. That impact helps to reduce effects of heat island and smog, boosts shading, food production, and so on. As stated by Landscape+Urbanism, here are four defining elements in vegitecture:
1. Using vegetation as a primary component of the building skin and roof systems.2. Creating usable site area in urban development by implementing landscaping on structure.3. Blurring the lines between interior and exterior spaces through design.4. Use of these strategies for environmental and social benefits.
Simple inclusion of plants here and there in architecture, pocket parks, on roofs, and on the street, make the concrete jungle a more friendly place for people to call a city home. Such projects befitting of the title vegitecture include a Miami parking structure, a design competition for an extension of nature over a busy freeway, and the lush greenery on the sides of an office building.
[Photo] Located in Santiago, Chile, the Consorcio Office building’s vegitecture acts as a vital environmental mitigation strategy: “The Consorcio Building in Santiago is one of the most sustainable office buildings, with up to 48% less energy usage thanks to its green wall, which turns red in autumn.” Inclusion of such plants bring insects into the picture, and help to spread and pollinate plants in the urban realm. (The beautiful colors of the plants aren’t too bad either.) This is a strong example of the benefits that vegitecture has on the environment, nature, and the personal well-being of those in the city.

Integrating Nature into the Concrete Jungle – Vegitecture 

What is Vegitecture?

Simply put: A unique form of architecture that seamlessly integrates plants into a building’s frame work. Vegitecture’s environmental impact is as noticeable as its plants too. That impact helps to reduce effects of heat island and smog, boosts shading, food production, and so on. As stated by Landscape+Urbanism, here are four defining elements in vegitecture:

1. Using vegetation as a primary component of the building skin and roof systems.
2. Creating usable site area in urban development by implementing landscaping on structure.
3. Blurring the lines between interior and exterior spaces through design.
4. Use of these strategies for environmental and social benefits.

Simple inclusion of plants here and there in architecture, pocket parks, on roofs, and on the street, make the concrete jungle a more friendly place for people to call a city home. Such projects befitting of the title vegitecture include a Miami parking structure, a design competition for an extension of nature over a busy freeway, and the lush greenery on the sides of an office building.

[Photo] Located in Santiago, Chile, the Consorcio Office building’s vegitecture acts as a vital environmental mitigation strategy: “The Consorcio Building in Santiago is one of the most sustainable office buildings, with up to 48% less energy usage thanks to its green wall, which turns red in autumn.” Inclusion of such plants bring insects into the picture, and help to spread and pollinate plants in the urban realm. (The beautiful colors of the plants aren’t too bad either.) This is a strong example of the benefits that vegitecture has on the environment, nature, and the personal well-being of those in the city.

9 August 2011 ♥ 24 notes           Reblog    High-Res
    source: land8.net

MOVE from Rick Mereki on Vimeo.

Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness” - Mark Twain 

Traveling is the book I have yet to read, or only read a few pages of (since I’ve been lucky enough to go to more than just a few states and have made a few international visits). I hope to pick up the book of traveling soon again and to read a little faster. This video is exciting! 

9 August 2011 ♥ 166 notes           Reblog    
reblogged from architizer    source: futurepredictor
"Great" Buildings?

The historical assumptions we have about the “Great buildings of the world,” the Egyptian Pyramids, the European and Asian fortresses, the great and marvelous metropolises that we see around us…

They’re expressions of a civilization and they’re great records, okay. But what are they records of? In fact, in most cases, they were created by the oppression of others, and in some case, the downright slavery of generations and generations of people. And so you think ‘Well, what’s so important and valuable about that?’ What does that mean to us now? We’re still doing that today.

25 July 2011           Reblog    

For all the curious cats wondering what I’ve done for Imagineering—here was the 2010 Disney work I did with my team.

9 July 2011 ♥ 10 notes           Reblog    
What’s so alluring about the architect profession?

I always find this entertaining :) Found this a while back.

Top 10 Reasons:

1. all night long, all night strong.

2. we are damn good with our hands.

3. if we can commit to chipboard, relationships should be easy.

4. you should see the things we erect.

5. use to doing things over and over again.

6. finishing early never happens.

7. we know the true meaning of interpretation

8. creative positioning.

9. work well in groups

10. entry and passage are always exciting.

8 July 2011           Reblog